Yugoslav 1 dinar coin

Yugoslav 1 dinar coin

FR Yugoslavia (1992–1999)

SFR/FPR Yugoslavia (1945–1992)

DF Yugoslavia (1945)

  • 1.00 Serbian dinar (2003–2010)
  • 1.00 Yugoslav dinar (1925–2003)
  • 5 g (1925)
  • 3.5 g (1938, 1992)
  • 3 g (1945)
  • 0.9 g (1953-1963)
  • 3.8 g (1965-1981)
  • 3.6 g (1982-1986)
  • 5.95 g (1990-1991)
  • 3.13 g (1993)
  • 4.96 g (1994)
  • 4.59 g (1994-1995)
  • 4.17 g (1996-1999)
  • 4.32 g (2000-2002)
  • 23 mm (1925, 1994)
  • 21 mm (1938)
  • 20 mm (1945, 1982-1986, 1996-2002)
  • 19.8 mm (1953-1963)
  • 21.8 mm (1965-1981)
  • 24 mm (1990-1991)
  • 19 mm (1992)
  • 18 mm (1993)
  • 22 mm (1994-1995)
  • 1.35 mm (1925)
  • 1.6 mm (1938-1945, 1992-1993, 1994-1995)
  • 1.3 mm (1953-1963)
  • 1.5 mm (1965-1986)
  • 1.8 mm (1990-1991)
  • 1.7 mm (1996-1999)
  • 1.85 mm (2000-2002)
  • cupronickel (1925, 1965-1968)
  • aluminum-bronze (1938)
  • zinc (1945)
  • aluminum (1953-1963)
  • copper-nickel-zinc (1973-1981, 1990-1991, 1993, 1994-2002)
  • brass (1982-1986, 1992, 1994)
  • coin (1925-1945)
  • medallic (1953-2002)
  • reeded (1925, 1945, 1965-1991, 1996-2002)
  • plain (1938, 1953-1963, 1992-1995)

The 1 dinar coin is a circulation piece of Yugoslavia, a former Southeast Europe an country that existed during the 20th and early 21st centuries. It was issued in 17 major types from 1925 to 2002: one under the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes, one under the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, one under the Democratic Federal Yugoslavia (DF Yugoslavia), one under the Federal People’s Republic of Yugoslavia (FPR Yugoslavia), seven under the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFR Yugoslavia), and six under the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FR Yugoslavia, later known as Serbia and Montenegro).

The first coin of the denomination was released in 1925, during the early reign of King Alexander I (1888–1934, r. 1921–1934). This piece was then followed in 1939 by a 1 dinar piece (dated 1938) of Alexander’s son and successor, King Peter II (1923–1970, r. 1934–1945). Both of the aforementioned coins initially carried a legal tender face value of 1.00 Yugoslav Serbian dinar in their country of origin. By the time Yugoslavia was invaded and occupied by the Axis powers in the spring of 1941, the coin of Alexander had already been withdrawn from circulation. The 1 dinar piece of Peter, however, continued to see use in the Serbian region of occupied Yugoslavia until 1942, holding a value of 1.00 Serbian dinar, or 1 ⁄250 of a Reichsmark.

Because the Yugoslav Serbian dinar was discontinued during World War II, the government of the Democratic Federal Yugoslavia established a new currency, the Federation dinar, in the spring of 1945. A new 1 dinar coin of the denomination was distributed later the same year by DF Yugoslavia, and was followed in 1954 by a piece (dated 1953) of the Federal People’s Republic of Yugoslavia and in 1964 by a similar coin (dated 1963) of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. All three coins initially circulated for a value of 1.00 Federation dinar. By the end of 1956, the 1945 piece was demonetized and withdrawn from circulation. The other two pieces, however, continued to be used even after the Federation dinar was discontinued in 1965. During the brief period between then and mid-1968, these later two coins remained valid for 0.01 hard dinar before being withdrawn.

Under the hard dinar, five coins of the denomination were manufactured, each holding a face value equivalent to 1.00 dinar. The first piece was released at the end of 1965, and the second was introduced near the end of 1968. These were followed in 1973 by a third standard circulation type, which continued to be manufactured annually until 1981. In 1977 a commemorative 1 dinar piece celebrating the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) was also released into circulation. The final 1 dinar coin of the hard dinar was introduced in 1982 and produced until 1986. With the exception of the 1965 piece, which was withdrawn in 1985, all of these coins were eventually demonetized in 1988.

In 1990, the hard dinar was replaced at a rate of 10,000 to 1 by the convertible dinar. A single 1 dinar piece, produced from 1990 to 1991, was released under this currency. Initially carrying a value of 1.00 convertible dinar, the coin was withdrawn and demonetized in mid-1992.

The first 1 dinar piece of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was introduced in the middle of 1992 as part of the new Yugoslav reformed dinar. It held a value of 1.00 dinar before being demonetized in mid-1993.

With the introduction of the «1993» or Octob

*Предлагаемые к заключению договоры или финансовые инструменты являются высокорискованными и могут привести к потере внесенных денежных средств в полном объеме. До совершения сделок следует ознакомиться с рисками, с которыми они связаны.

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